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2019 Annual Biosolids Compliance Report Available

OCSD's Biosolids Program Regulatory Compliance and Program Update

Post Date:02/19/2020 10:00 AM

OCSD’s annual compliance report details how we met regulatory requirements onsite, and how our biosolids were recycled offsite. Biosolids compliance reports are submitted to regulators by February 19th each year. OCSD's submitted report is available on our website: ocsd.com/503.

In 2019:

  • OCSD produced 230,533 wet tons of biosolids (52,003 dry metric tons),
  • This equates to an average of 632 wet tons per day of biosolids, including digester cleanings managed as biosolids (609 tons per day excluding digester cleanings).
  • OCSD produced 21% less biosolids than during 2018 due to the commissioning of dewatering centrifuges at both treatment plants.

Please review the report (www.ocsd.com/503) to read :

  • OCSD recycled 100% of our biosolids. Table 2 details where OCSD’s biosolids were recycled. 
  • Accomplishments including receiving the National Association of Clean Water Agencies Platinum Award.

  • Dewatering centrifuge commissioning began at Plant No. 1.

  • Eight (8) digesters were cleaned.

  • Status of OCSD's biosolids management system including communications and contractor oversight metrics.

  • Biosolids production history (1992-2019).

Feel free to contact Deirdre Bingman (dbingman@ocsd.com or 714.593-7459) if you have any questions regarding this information.

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  • 2019 Annual Biosolids Compliance Report Available

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    02/19/2020 10:00 AM

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